SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTER

Talking to Children about ISIS

Edited by Dario Ianes

Product: Book

Trim size in cm: 15x21

Pages: 148 in full colour

ISBN: 978-88-590-1115-6

Publication date: 01/03/2016


REQUEST A SAMPLE OR MORE INFORMATION


youtube   Video





ENGLISH TRANSLATION AVAILABLE.

Which words can parents use to explain religious fanaticism and terrorist attacks to their children while making sure they still feel protected and safe?

How can teachers talk to their own students about Islam, the Koran and the caliphate, without prejudice and avoiding excessive simplifications?

Can education be an antidote to violence?

This book teaches adults how to explain the difficult topics of ISIS and Islamic terrorism to children in a simple, understandable and complete way.

It is perfect for both teachers and parents, as it contains all the lexis, instruments, concepts and ways that they can use to explain what Islamic terrorism is to children and how and why it came about, as well as other difficult topics such as massacres, attacks and fear.

It can be used both by parents and teachers at school. The topic is addressed from the following points of view:

  • emotional, thanks to the guidance and tips of Alberto Pellai, a psychotherapist who shows us the best way to talk about violence and massacres, to explain war and to deal with fear;
  • historical and cultural, with the contribution of Marco Montanari, who talks about the history of terrorism and the current conditions of most Muslim countries, based on documented and objective sources;
  • theoretical and philosophical, thanks to the contribution of Edgar Morin and Riccardo Mazzeo, who deal with the topics of dialogue and coexistence.


Introduction by Dario Ianes

 

FIRST PART – WORDS: HOW TO TALK TO THOSE BORN AFTER 9/11

A competent adult helps children emotionally (Alberto Pellai)

 

SECOND PART – THINGS: WHO AND WHAT ARE WE TALKING ABOUT

Conceptual geography of the Islamic State (Marco Montanari)

 

THIRD PART – THINKING: THE NEED TO REFLECT UPON THESE TOPICS

Trying to understand ISIS in its own complexity (Edgar Morin and Riccardo Mazzeo)